The Ship - Only Remembered?

For all things Clyde-related
User avatar
SCameron
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:56 pm
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Contact:

The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by SCameron » Fri Dec 02, 2011 7:16 am

This is the McCalman's version of 'Only Remembered', which is the song that I always remember as the conclusion of that awesome Bill Bryden production "The Ship - the Epic Story of A River and its People" which played at the old Harland & Wolff Engine Shop, next to the Govan Drydocks during 1990, the year that Glasgow was European City of Culture. Phil Cunningham was musical director if I remember correctly - certainly 'Only Remembered' was an inspired choice to end the play with the cast singing it as a massive part of the set was 'launched' over the top of the audience as a representation of a real ship launch. I saw a slightly abridged version of 'The Ship' on BBC TV once but have never found any on the internet. Has anyonr found it on YouTube or elsewhere?




SC

User avatar
Gordy
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2011 11:53 am

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by Gordy » Sat Dec 03, 2011 10:58 am

Really enjoyed that, thanks for posting.

The Ship was the best 'theatrical event' I ever attended.

At the performance I was at, a scene with Jimmy Logan as the manager and another actor were down looking at the hull and discussing the progress.
As they walked away, the dance hall mirrored ball, used in a previous scene, fell from quite a height, landed less than 3 feet behind them and smashed to smithereens.

They never missed a step or turned round.
True professionals :clap:

User avatar
SCameron
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:56 pm
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Contact:

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by SCameron » Sun Dec 04, 2011 11:31 pm

Gordy

The couple of times I saw it I was really impressed with the performances of all of the Company but especially those of Jimmy Logan and Tom Watson, who played the pub philosopher / ''white finger shirker' Hughie. The roll casting was spot on - I could fit each of the fictitious characters in The Ship to real guys I had met in my early career in the shops of the
B&W factory at Renfrew. With the substantial disappearance of the manufacturing function a lot of the inherent humour (sometime quite black humour) has gone. Recently, I attended a talk by our most senior management in which the next round of changes, which we need to adopt to survive, was outlined. Interestingly, he made an off-the-cuff comment that even after all these changes are made the job should still involve some fun. I'm not sure if he meant the kind of fun that used to go on on the shop floor though:)

Anyhow I found the copy of the brochure for 'The Ship' that I got when I went to see it in Govan - I should have 2 copies because I went to see it twice but I can only find one - hard to believe its 21 years ago!

Some years later I took my parents, who had been avid supporters of the Glasgow theatre scene in the days before TV and Iinternet, to see Jimmy Logan's last performance in the Pavilion. It was an extrordinarily moving experience - it was obvious to all that his illness was well advanced and that his remaining days could not be many. No one was more aware of it than the man himself. But his performance was professional to the end and, despite the underlying sadness of the event, the laughs were many. I think he passed away about 3 weeks later.
TS01.jpg
The front cover
TS02.jpg
This one (bottom picture) shows the set up that was created to give the impression of The Ship being launched at the end of the play. I must admit that, having been to many real shp launches beforehand I was really sceptical that this would work but it did - well nearly
TS03.jpg
Last edited by SCameron on Mon Dec 05, 2011 12:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
SCameron
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:56 pm
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Contact:

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by SCameron » Sun Dec 04, 2011 11:45 pm

Some more of the brochure
TS04.jpg
The Shipyard Characters and the Actors and Actresses that played them
TS05.jpg
This one takes me back to the second time I went when I decided to forego my seat for getting down amongst the action - which was actively encouraged. You could quickly find yourself in the middle of a set. That time I ended up doing a 'Gay Gordons' with one of female cast at the near-the-end party:)
TS06.jpg

User avatar
SCameron
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:56 pm
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Contact:

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by SCameron » Sun Dec 04, 2011 11:59 pm

The last few - I've just remembered - only remembered:) - that they used the area between Govan Graving Dock No1 and No2 as the car park for audience members. They had hired security guys - mainly to fend off the the local 'Watch yer motor, Mister?' urchins.
Attachments
TS07.jpg
TS08.jpg
TS09.jpg

User avatar
gerrydee
Posts: 196
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 4:44 pm

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by gerrydee » Mon Dec 05, 2011 1:12 am

STUART
I got my program out scanned it just ready to post it when I saw you had already posted your propgram.
It was a very good show .
GERRY

User avatar
Gordy
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2011 11:53 am

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by Gordy » Mon Dec 05, 2011 9:19 pm

If they re-produced the tee shirts they'd be on a winner.

I had mine on at work, (oil production platform), a big bear of an electrician got talking about his night at the show,
"not a dry eye in the house" he said.

So true.

User avatar
duncanwilson
Posts: 172
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2010 10:00 am
Location: Lenzie

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by duncanwilson » Mon Dec 05, 2011 9:51 pm

A lot of familiar names among the cast. Correct me if I am wrong, but was Joseph Brady in Z Cars back in the 60s?

User avatar
Magoonigal
Posts: 1023
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 6:04 pm
Location: Blyth.

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by Magoonigal » Mon Dec 05, 2011 11:41 pm

The Guardian, Monday 25 June 2001 02.18 BST
Article history


In the early 1960s, the wave of social realism sweeping over British cinema had its counterpart on television with shows like the BBC police series Z Cars (1962). Joseph "Joe" Brady, who has died aged 72 of cancer, was one of its stars, an actor who became one of the most famous faces in Britain as the Scots policeman Jock Weir.
Conceived by writer Troy Kennedy Martin and Elwyn Jones, Z Cars left a legacy which - through series like Cops - still resonates in British television. It was set just north of Liverpool, and was launched as the Mersey sound was about to make the area world-famous. Its cast reflected the region's diversity, and its treatment of the relationship between police and society was part of a new radicalism about Britain itself.

Brady's character, a rugby-playing Scot, was one half of the Z-Victor 1 team, with "Fancy" Smith (Brian Blessed). The series began with a newly formed group of uniformed officers, driving the then fashionable Ford Zephyrs and dealing with violence, robbery and domestic issues in "New Town". Their counterparts in Z-Victor 2, Bert Lynch and Bob Steele, were played by James Ellis and Jeremy Kemp.

The chemistry of the series worked on and off the screen. The actors mixed socially and Brady and Ellis became lifelong friends. In the Z Cars era, Joe, who had a pleasant singing voice, even recorded two songs by his fellow countryman Tommy Scott.

One of a large Glaswegian working-class family, Brady spent five years in the Merchant Navy, before, encouraged by his sister, deciding to become an actor. In 1958, he graduated from the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama as "best comedy actor" and "most promising male actor". He was given a year's contract at the Glasgow Citizens' Theatre, and spent a year at Perth Theatre before joining Z Cars.

After leaving the police series in the late 1960s, he played the lead in the BBC's 17th-century costume drama The Borderers, which ran for 26 episodes from 1969 to 1970. This gave him the opportunity to dye his hair red - and, enthusiastically, to learn to ride a horse.

After that, he alternated between stage and television. His television appearances included Dr Finlay's Casebook, Taggart, The Bill and Casualty. In 1973, he played one of four musicians in David Pinner's The Potsdam Quartet, at the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre, Guildford, and toured with Shirley Anne Field in The Hasty Heart.

In Scotland, he appeared in many productions at the Edinburgh Lyceum, including Hadrian VII, The Taming Of The Shrew, and Satire Of The Third Estates. In 1974, he joined very strong casts in Bill Bryden's plays Benny Lynch and Willie Rough at the Lyceum. Other plays included The Bevellers (1974), written by Roddy McMillan.

In 1985, he was in The Seagull, with Vanessa Redgrave, at the Haymarket, London. In 1988, he was in Billy Roche's big success, A Handful Of Stars, at the Bush Theatre, west London. One of his favourite roles was that of the young boxer Joe Bonaparte's father in the National Theatre's 1984 production of Clifford Odets's Golden Boy.

Brady was a fervent Celtic fan. He saw his team almost win the European Cup in Milan in 1970, where they lost to Feyenoord. On that occasion, he helped to ensure that many inebriated fellow fans were hustled on to their Glasgow flights - thus almost missing his own connection to Rome to see the Pope. For 25 years, he was a season ticket holder, and fan of Stan Bowles, at Queens Park Rangers, and, whether they won or not, he could be found happily jawing in the players' lounge afterwards

Thoughtful and generous, Brady, a bachelor, lived in Chiswick, west London.

• Joseph 'Joe' Brady, actor, born October 9 1928; died June 12 2001
Paul Hood.

User avatar
Deepol
Posts: 4440
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 12:20 pm
Location: Glasgow

Re: The Ship - Only Remembered?

Post by Deepol » Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:15 am

Still got the video tape (remember them) of it when it was on BBC many moons ago.
Paul Strathdee

Post Reply

Return to “CLYDE”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot], williemac and 12 guests