Tragic event in the Pentland Firth

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Angus Mac Kinnon
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Tragic event in the Pentland Firth

Post by Angus Mac Kinnon » Sun Jan 04, 2015 2:06 am

M.V. CEMFJORD : IMO 8403569 : Cypriot Registry : Managers - Brise of Hamburg

Although no Mayday call or other form of distress indication received, it is believed the above ship has foundered with the loss of all hands in a position East of the Pentland Skerries, whilst on a passage from the Danish port of Aalborg to the English port of Runcorn in Cheshire, with a cargo of cement.

The vessel was found stern-down perpendicular in the water with only a short portion of her bow showing. There has been no indication of survivors until now and, with darkness falling, and bad weather, the search was called off and will resume tomorrow.

The vessel was built in 1984 by Messrs Hegemann Roland of Bremen - their Yard Number 126.

She was launched as M.V. MAGARETA for original Owner T. Schepers

She was converted in 1998 for the carriage of cement products

Renamed M.V. CEMFJORD in 2004

GRT : 1,781 T.
DWT : 2,550 T

Dimensions : 78.5m X 83.2m X 11.5m

Propulsion : Diesel Oil Engine providing sufficient power for a vessel speed of 10.5 knots

Complement: Understood to normally be 8 of a crew
Angus Mac Kinnon

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Deepol
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Location: Glasgow

Re: Tragic event in the Pentland Firth

Post by Deepol » Sun Jan 04, 2015 11:34 am

The dangers of seafaring and how we do not appreciate enough those who go to sea.
Paul Strathdee

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Angus Mac Kinnon
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Re: Tragic event in the Pentland Firth

Post by Angus Mac Kinnon » Mon Jan 05, 2015 8:34 pm

Well remember the trepidation felt back in the 50s when Robertson's wee steamers passed back and fro through the Pentland Firth, a bad piece of water if ever there was, strong currents and ebbs/flows, gales and visibility. These wee steamers could manage perhaps 7 or 8 knots and they often had to 'dodge' until the conditions were more favourable to make passage.

I had my fair share of this as a youngster away on trips, during school holidays with my late Father. I knew my Mother back home would be glued to the 'wireless' trawlerband listening for exchanges between Company's vessels to identify respective locations, ETAs and weather conditions.

My respect and admiration for these coaster-men, especially the Lewis and Barra men, and those great seamen from County Antrim Glens (Cushendall, Cushendun, Waterfoot, Carnlough, Glenarm) knew no bounds. In terms of competence and ever-present sense of humour they were truly salt of the earth.

:clap:
Angus Mac Kinnon

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